East Texas Herpetological Society

East Texas Herpetological Society


ethsnews@hotmail.com

ETHS is dedicated to the education of its members and the general public about the natural history, ecology, husbandry, conservation, proper care and treatment of reptiles and amphibians.

The ETHS is a nonprofit corporation operating under charter in the State of Texas subject to the rules and regulations of IRS 501(c)(3).

Guest Speakers

After a while Crocodile – Status and Conflict Management of the American Crocodile in Costa Rica – Dr. Mahmood Sasa

Mahmood Sasa Marin works as a full professor at the Clodomiro Picado Institute, a research center from the University of Costa Rica that focus in  toxinological research the production of snake antivenom for the Central American region and other countries. He is also director of the Palo Verde Biological Station, Organization for Tropical Studies, in northwestern Costa Rica.  Mahmood did his undergraduate studies at the School of Biology, University of Costa Rica and holds a PhD in Quantitative Biology from the University of Texas at Arlington under the supervision of Jonathan A. Campbell and Paul Chippindale. He has authored or co-authored more than 70 scientific publications, especially in the field of systematics and biogeography of venomous snakes, and in the biochemical characterization of toxins. Mahmood is currently conducting studies on the phenology of dry forest anurans, epidemiology of snakebite, and crocodile ecology.

Serpientes, Lagaritas, Tortugas, Oh mi… – Herpetological Diversity of the Sierra Madre Oriental – Michael Price

Michael Price is the Executive Director of the Eaton Hill Nature Center and Wildlife Preserve in Sonora, Texas, as well as owner of Wild About Texas, LLC. His passion for the comparatively unknown herpetological fauna in Mexico led him to travel south of the border on over two dozen field trips from 2008 to 2016. This presentation is
a synopsis of those excursions. Beginning in 2009, while he was the Director of the San Angelo Nature Center, he collaborated with UANL (Universidad Autonoma Nuevo Leon) in Monterrey, the SRE (Secretaria de Relaciones Exteriores) and the USFWS (United States Fish and Wildlife Service) on obtaining the necessary permits to collect and export animals to the US from Mexico for the San Angelo Nature Center, joining the San Antonio Zoo and the Los Angeles Zoo as the only institutions in the US permitted to do so at that time. Mr. Price is a published author, and his second book was released in the fall of 2014. He is also an accomplished photographer and many of his photographs have appeared in several national magazines and numerous field guides. His newspaper column entitled Wild About Texas can be seen in nearly 20 Texas newspapers. Mr. Price is the proud father of 5 wonderful children who, just like their dad, drive their mother insane with their passion for things of the ectothermic persuasion.

Reptiles and Exotic Pets – Perspectives from a Veterinary Surgeon – Dr. Michael McFadden

Reptiles as a Teaching Aid – Walter Palmisano

Who would think of an alligator as a way to learn about History? When the first Europeans explored China they encountered what they thought were dragons. Even in the Bible, there are mentions of a crocodile in the book of Job. In Japan drum-makers use mathematical patterns in Taiko Drums. These patterns are carvings of reptiles. Makes learning about Math Transformations (rotations,reflections,transitions) a lot more fun.Biology,Art,Literature,the list goes on. Reptiles can be a big part in getting people interested in learning.
Asian Turtle Enthusiast
Reptile Zookeeper
Retired Grade school Teacher
Disability Counselor
Proud Longtime Member of E.T.H.S.

 

Using Mitochrondial DNA to determine the locality of Lampropeltis alterna – Dr. Larry Nordyke

Lampropeltis alterna, the gray-banded kingsnake , is a medium sized colubrid snake found in west Texas, southern New Mexico and, northern Mexico. It inhabits the xeric hillsides, canyons, and mountain slopes of the northern Chihuahuan Desert along the Rio Grande, eastward into the Edwards Plateau, and westward into the mountains of the western Trans-Pecos. The color and patterning of L. alterna is extremely variable throughout its range with local population groups often separated by geographic barriers and availability of water. Over their limited range, small habitat isolated populations are often separated by geographic and environmental barriers with gene flow between isolated groups considered to be minimal. L. alterna was studied using DNA sequences of the mitochondrial gene ND4. Sequences were aligned and analyzed using clustal omega. We identified ND4 haplotypes and correlated this data with locality of L. alterna.
Bio: I have a M.S. in Microbiology and Ph.D. in Biochemistry from the University of Houston. Since 1974, I have been a Professor of Biology and Director of the Pre-Medical Program at the University of St. Thomas in Houston. My interest in herps began with a 1988 trip to Costa Rica (in search of the golden toad) with Paul and Mara Freed. My introduction to the East Texas Herpetological Society was by Wayne Howell. Finally, I caught alterna fever from Dan Johnson and Dave Doherty. Since then I have been in search of a laboratory technique that could be used to identify the locality of snakes.

 

The Dry-forest Reptiles and Amphibians of Middle America – Synopsis of an amazing FaunalAssemblage – Dr. Mahmood Sasa

Mahmood Sasa Marin works as a full professor at the Clodomiro Picado Institute, a research center from the University of Costa Rica that focus in  toxinological research the production of snake antivenom for the Central American region and other countries. He is also director of the Palo Verde Biological Station, Organization for Tropical Studies, in northwestern Costa Rica.  Mahmood did his undergraduate studies at the School of Biology, University of Costa Rica and holds a PhD in Quantitative Biology from the University of Texas at Arlington under the supervision of Jonathan A. Campbell and Paul Chippindale. He has authored or co-authored more than 70 scientific publications, especially in the field of systematics and biogeography of venomous snakes, and in the biochemical characterization of toxins. Mahmood is currently conducting studies on the phenology of dry forest anurans, epidemiology of snakebite, and crocodile ecology.

 

Venomous Snakes and Snakebites in the American Tropics – Ray Morgan

Globally each year, venomous snakebite is estimated to kill between 50,000 and 125,000 people and permanently injure several hundred thousand. While fatalities are rare in developed places like Europe, Australia and the US, snakebite remains a major cause of mortality and morbidity through the developing world. Deaths from snakebite in the tropics of Central and South America is 50-100 times higher than in the US. In 2017, the World Health Organization officially classified snakebite as a Neglected Tropical Disease.

The factors that contribute to this situation include travel-related delays in treating snakebite emergencies and the presence of large pitvipers like Crotalus, Bothrops and Lachesis. Additional challenges include incomplete epidemiological data, insufficient supplies of appropriate, high-quality antivenoms, and inadequate training of medical professionals to manage envenomation.

Herping in the Peruvian Amazon Region – Matt Cage

The Amazon River basin of South America is one of the most natural, unspoiled, and ecologically diverse places on earth. Here you will find some of the largest undisturbed tracks of primary rainforest left in existence. Viewing the variety of plants, insects, mammals, birds, and fishes is an incredible experience that all naturalists should enjoy at least once in their life.  On top of that, over five hundred species of reptiles and amphibians live in the lowland Amazon jungles. Take this journey with me into the Peruvian Amazon to see some of the amazing people, scenery, and wildlife of this remarkable area.  Travel into the Amazon basin searching for some of the most spectacular species of reptiles and amphibians that are waiting to be discovered and photographed. Experience the wonder and natural beauty of the truly unique and untamed Peruvian Amazon through photographs that all nature lovers can appreciate.
Matt Cage grew up in a family where vacations were geared around finding reptiles and amphibians. His Father, Young Cage, instilled an interest in nature, environmentalism, and photography. Matt has extensive experience guiding trips and traveling to the American tropics.  Matt has traveled to and photographed wildlife in the Caribbean, Mexico, Central and South America, Africa, Australia, and all over the USA. He has been a Trip Leader for MT Amazon Expeditions since 2010 and has led 12 trips to the Peruvian Amazon region.  You can see Matt’s photos in many published books and papers.  Matt has a Bachelor of Science degree in Wildlife Biology from Colorado State University and currently resides in the Denver, Colorado area. You can view Matt’s photos at www.cages.smugmug.com. You can contact him by e-mail at cages2000@msn.com

 

 

 

 

 

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Live Reptile & Amphibian Expo!
Sunday, September 17th 11:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Note that live animals are only for sale on Sunday, Sept. 17